The Angel’s Kiss by Melody Malone

This is the first Doctor Who book written by a character…per se, and happens to be the book The Doctor is reading aloud to an initially unwilling Amy and Rory while sitting in Central Park in their farewell episode *sob* The Angels Take Manhattan.

We meet Melody Malone a private detective who specializes in angels. But not just any kind of angels, Weeping Angels. Though their actual name isn’t mentioned in the book, you still know. Melody is in 1930’s New York, and has just been visited by Rock Railton, a famous movie star who is looking for her help because he thinks someone is out to kill him. And he’s right, but it’s not what you think. Rock has invited Melody to a swanky publicity party so she can begin to solve Rock’s problem, but as she attends the party, Rock doesn’t know who she is, and can’t remember meeting her the day before. How can this be? To figure this out Melody meets Railton’s slimy manager who offers to make Melody a movie star, but at what cost? And why would he have his very own angel?

The story is a quick and easy read (48 pages), and is written in the smart self-indulging personality of River Song. It’s a cute story, but that’s about it. I didn’t feel I had read anything great, and was a little disappointed on how short it was (and yes I know it’s only supposed to be a portion of the book in the episode). There were a lot of pages spent on description of scenes, more than telling the story. Take away the filler, and you would have a 10 page book. It felt rushed and I feel it could have had more depth.

Book Rating: 

– a la Chryshele

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